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High Cholesterol and FH

About 1 in 200 people have FH, but according to the FH Foundation, only around 10 percent are diagnosed. The condition can be devastating to those who have it. Unless treated properly, people with FH who have one faulty gene can have a heart attack or other cardiac event as young as in their 40s or 50s. Those with two faulty genes can have cardiac events as young as in their late teens or early 20s. This type of FH is much more difficult to treat. Signs and Symptoms of FH FH is somewhat different from “typical” high LDL cholesterol in that it can have distinct signs and symptoms. These can include: • Untreated LDL-C levels that range from 190mg/dL to 400mg/dL or even higher. (Children with FH generally have LDL-C levels above 160mg/dL, but in pre-teens, levels can be even lower.) • A family history of early heart attacks or high levels of total and LDL cholesterol • LDL-C levels in either or both parents that are elevated and resistant to treatment • Xanthomas (waxy deposits of cholesterol in the skin or tendons), xanthelasmas (yellowish cholesterol deposits in the eyelids) or corneal arcus (white, arced cholesterol deposits around the cornea of the eye) • Angina (chest pain), which can signal the presence of heart disease 17


High Cholesterol and FH
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