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Mended Little HeartGuide

Diagnosis 3 In The betrayed. Children would rather understand what is going on than know that they have a problem no one will talk about. Kids know when something is different about them, and they know when parents are trying to hide something. Avoiding the topic of CHD will make your child feel that there is something wrong with him or her. Learn to talk about it early in an age-appropriate way. Talk to a social worker or counselor if you need help with this. Being open and honest about your child’s health problems will make it seem like he or she has nothing to hide or be ashamed of. It will help your whole family accept the situation and live a more “normal” life — just a different kind of normal. Focus on your child’s abilities, not limitations. Parents and caregivers may believe that their child has the same limitations as another child with the same CHD. Don’t make those assumptions. Finding out what your child can do and what his or her limitations are will require an honest talk with your child’s cardiologist and pediatrician. Things change as your child grows, so you may need to have the conversation several times. Sometimes, for example, children with CHD can play a rigorous sport when they are younger but have to stop as that sport becomes more physically taxing and competitive. When your child wants to do something that he or she can’t do because of CHD, offer other options. If your child really wants to play football but can’t, suggest baseball, golf or another sport recommended by his or her doctor. When your child is old enough (usually around eight years old), allow him or her to talk to the doctor about limitations and activities. Having someone other than a parent explain the reasons for limitations can help. 1 General Information 2 Prenatal Hospital 4 Living With CHD 5 Forms 79


Mended Little HeartGuide
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