Page 70

Mended Little HeartGuide

Introduction Contents SECTION • Avoid low-fat and fat-free items. • In addition to fruits and vegetables, offer foods that are naturally high in calories: peanut butter, avocados, cheese, nuts/seeds, beans, meats, etc. For more helpful information on increasing calories, see this list of high-calorie foods from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Heart-Healthy Nutrition for Life At the beginning of your child’s life, you may have needed to increase calories so that your son or daughter would gain weight, but as he or she grows older, it is important to encourage a heart-healthy diet. A balanced diet will not only help your child avoid acquired heart disease and other conditions, it will also keep their weight at a healthy level. Pairing a nutritious diet with exercise where possible (see the section in this Mended Little HeartGuide on Exercise and CHD) will help children stay healthy into adulthood. About My Child’s Heart Table of It may be necessary for your child to follow a lowsodium or fat-restricted diet at some point. It is also possible that his or her energy needs will always be higher than someone without CHD. Here are some general guidelines to follow. For more information, consult a dietitian: • Eat foods from all food groups (vegetables, fruits, meat/protein, dairy, grains). • Choose whole grains when possible (whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, brown rice, oatmeal, whole grain cereal, etc.). Avoid foods made with white flour. • Choose lean meats (turkey, chicken, lean beef, fish). • Use low-fat methods to cook foods (baking, broiling or grilling instead of frying). • Limit the use of a salt shaker and limit frozen, canned and boxed foods, which are generally higher in sodium/salt. • Choose fresh fruits over fruit juice. • Eat a variety of non-starchy vegetables daily. For more information about healthy eating for the whole family, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. Go To 70


Mended Little HeartGuide
To see the actual publication please follow the link above